Tasmania National Parks

National Parks of Tasmania


With a fifth of its land cover being marked as Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area, it is safe to say, Tasmania is a land of national parks. Each as dazzling as the last, here’s a look at four of the best national parks in Tasmania.  

Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park

From rugged mountains and looking glass lakes to ancient forests and one-of-a-kind wildlife, Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park is one of the most stunning national park in Tasmania. Rising 1,545 metres above the scenic Dove Lake, Cradle Mountain will have you gazing for hours, tracing the shape of a miner’s cradle along its jagged edges while its many walks will overwhelm you with their sheer beauty. 

Rich in flora and fauna, the vegetation here varies from rainforest to grassland, providing habitats for endemic Tasmanian mammals, birds and invertebrates. The area is home to the world’s largest carnivorous marsupials including the Tasmanian devil, the spotted-tailed quoll and the eastern quoll. Two of the world’s only three surviving monotremes – the most primitive group of mammals in the world – are also found in the area, the platypus and the echidna.
 
Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park

Freycinet National Park 

Located on the east coast of Tasmania, Freycinet is considered one of the state’s most picturesque coastal areas and attracts several visitors each year. The winning formula of imposing granite peaks and white sandy beaches lining cerulean bays – coupled with a mild maritime climate – has made this park home to many bird species including the rare white-bellied eagle and yellow-tailed black cockatoos. 


Some of the highlights of the park include the variety of granite deposits, the pink-orange boulders at The Hazards, the gorgeous Wine Glass Bay and the fine silica sands of Friendly Beaches which are highly sought for glass production. 

Freycinet National Park

Tasman National Park 

Tasman National Park is renowned for its dramatic landscapes, from spectacularly tall sea cliffs, diverse forest and pristine coastline to the abundant wildlife including seals, penguins, dolphins and whales. Australian fur seals inhabit the rugged coastline for breeding and resting, while fairy penguins nest along the shore. Many birds including gannets, scarlet robins plus endangered wedge-tail eagles and white-bellied sea eagles call this park home. 
 
For budding botanists, the park also contains a number of plant species found nowhere else in the world, including three beautiful and rare species of euphrasia, found only in coastal heath communities of the Tasman National Park. 
Tasman National Park

Franklin Gordon Wild Rivers National Park 

A land shaped by ancient melting glaciers, Franklin Gordon Wild Rivers National Park is a must visit for the nature enthusiast. Take the time to admire the towering Huon pines, the winding rivers, the lush rainforests, the stunning mountains and the dramatic valleys. Here is a place where you can be lost in nature. 
 
Franklin Gordon Wild Rivers National Park also has a rich history and is dotted with several aboriginal as well as convict sites. In 1982 the park was added to the UNESCO World Heritage listing, thereby helping preserve one of Tasmania’s last remaining wild rivers. 
 
On a trail through the park, you will be treated to the sights and sounds of the most spectacular bird life. Keep a look out for the short-tailed shearwater, white-bellied sea eagle, the striking Tasmanian Azure Kingfisher and the adorable pink robin. The park’s temperate wilderness provides an ideal habitat for varied vegetation and birdlife. 
Franklin Gordon Wild Rivers National Park